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2010 Miyone Garnacha Seleccion Old Vines

by Dennis Mayer December 11th, 2012 | Budget-Friendly Wine Review
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Today’s wine is a Spanish bottle, but of a varietal that I haven’t sampled before. At least, not by itself.

Garnacha grapes are one of the most popular grown in Spain, but they’re known for being fairly sweet and simple, without much tannin or acid. Those late-ripening grapes are usually blended with other grapes to make a more balanced wine, much like the separate elements of a Bordeaux. The 2010 Miyone Garnacha, however, is made from 100 percent Garnacha grapes. The vineyard is located in Aragon, a province on the northern border of Spain, with Catalonia on its western flank and France to the north.

How does it look? The color of this garnacha is black cherry red, but it’s a fairly translucent color. The wine’s legs are long and thick, and the drops cling easily to the glass when swirled, which makes me expect this wine will be light-bodied, but sweet.

 How does it smell? The nose of this wine is light-bodied, with ripe red fruits (raspberries and plums, mainly) comprising almost the entire olfactory experience. I’m noticing no tannins, secondary flavors, or even much of an alcoholic odor, despite the wine’s 13.5 percent alcohol by volume.

But how does it taste?  The 2010 Miyone is light and somewhat sweet, but not so much that it’s cloying or simple. I get plum and raspberry notes, but they’re not very tart. The wine is slightly astringent, due to the high alcoholic content, but I don’t get any tannins, or an alcoholic flavor. The smoothness and simplicity, I expect, is because this wine has aged for a couple of years — maybe I’d notice some spices or some other flavor if this was a bit younger. (Or maybe it’d be less tasty.)

What should I eat with it? I would serve poultry, lean pork, flavorful fish, roasted or raw vegetables, or other hors d’oeuvres with this Garnacha. It’s not quite sweet enough to function as a dessert wine, nor is it strong enough to really stand up to the richest foods in your cookbook. Still, this is an interesting wine, and would probably be very accessible to guests at dinner parties that may not be big fans of more tannic, complex varietals.

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