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Scooby Snack

by Dennis Mayer February 26th, 2013 | Cocktails
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malibu rum bottleToday’s drink isn’t a classic cocktail or a high-octane number like much of the stuff we write about here — it’s just a sweet, slight concoction that’s usually taken as a shot.

Some quick background on the ingredients:

Malibu rum, a coconut-flavored rum-based liqueur which clocks in at 21 percent alcohol by volume (42 proof), seems like something that would have been dreamed up by a marketing department (and it is the subject of a fairly ubiquitous, if not mildly racist, marketing campaign), but the company that now owns the brand, Pernod-Ricard, claims to trace its roots back 350 years, to soon after the creation of rum itself. The liqueur likely evolved as a tool to make the mixing of piña coladas a bit easier; indeed, shaking up a bit of Malibu with some pineapple juice, then floating some dark rum on top, will make the drink in no time at all.

Midori is a musk melon-flavored liqueur made by Japanese whiskey makers Suntory. (Yes, these guys.) Suntory, I read, has been making a melon liqueur for much of its history since opening in 1899. (Melon is extremely expensive in Japan, much like beef — they both need lots of room to grow, and the small island country has very little room for things like cattle pastures or large melon patches where vines can stretch out correctly.) Suntory, according to its own history of the liqueur, only developed Midori for the international market after visitors from the International Bartender’s Association (which, yes, exists — click through!) liked a musk-melon liqueur they tasted while visiting company headquarters in 1971. The liqueur was developed soon after, and was launched at a party at Studio 54 in 1978. (Please believe me when I say I searched long and hard to find a photo of that.) Midori, like Malibu, is 42 proof (21 percent alcohol by volume), making them both half-potent potables, to borrow a Readers’ Digest term (which I promise never to do again.)

Anyway, the Scooby Snack. Coconut and melon, together, mixed with either pineapple juice or milk (oddly, both make basically the same color, though the pineapple obviously adds something, while the milk just takes on the flavors of the liqueurs.) The recipe here will give you a roughly 2 oz. shooter, but if you’d rather have a dessert cocktail, double the recipe and you’ll get a sweet martini that’s weak enough to let you leave the bar walking a straight line. (That is, if you only have the one.)

While the Midori and Scooby-Doo were both products of the 1970s, I can’t find any further reason for the name of this drink. I don’t think Scooby Snacks were ever green, and they never tasted like melon or coconut. (Wikipedia says they were originally envisioned to be, basically, peanut butter cookies.) Again, I digress.

Scooby Snack (shooter)

  • .75 oz. Midori melon liqueur
  • .75 oz. Malibu rum.
  • 1 oz.  milk or pineapple juice

Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker over ice and stain into 4-oz shot glass or small old-fashioned glass. For a martini-sized serving, double the recipe.

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